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Friday, August 7, 2020 | History

1 edition of importance of resistance to anthelmintics in equine nematode populations. found in the catalog.

importance of resistance to anthelmintics in equine nematode populations.

importance of resistance to anthelmintics in equine nematode populations.

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Published by Pfizer Ltd. in Sandwich, Kent .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Veterinary parasitology.,
  • Nematoda.,
  • Horses -- Parasites.,
  • Anthelmintics.

  • The Physical Object
    Pagination11p. :
    Number of Pages11
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL21542502M

      The old recommendation to deworm all horses every six weeks hastened the development of anthelmintic resistance. “Every time you use a dewormer you’re pushing the worm population toward. Studies in other nematode species have indicated that once a lack of efficacy of a specific anthelmintic is obvious (as demonstrated by a failed FECRT), it is too late to affect the preponderance of drug resistance within a given population (Martin et al. ). Hence, the containment of ML resistance should be a priority in equine parasite.

    Helminths are important and highly prevalent pathogens of horses and other Equidae worldwide, particularly nematodes belonging to the cyathostomin group. Helminths have been controlled for over 40 years using broad-spectrum anthelmintics that are often administered in interval treatment programmes, but long-term, frequent use of these drugs has led to the development of drug resistance. Macrocyclic lactone (ML) anthelmintics are the most important class of anthelmintics because of our high dependence on them for the control of nematode parasites and some ectoparasites in livestock, companion animals and in humans. However, resistance to MLs is of increasing concern. Resistance .

      This article is published as part of Parasites & Vectors Volume 2 Supplement 2, This supplement includes the Proceedings of the "Workshop on equine cyathostomins, the most important parasitic helminth of horses: epidemiology, clinical significance, drug resistance and control" that was held at the University of Teramo, Italy on 20th May,   Equine gastrointestinal nematodes (GINs) have been the subject of intermittent studies in Australia over the past few decades. However, comprehensive information on the epidemiology of equine GINs, the efficacy of available anthelmintic drugs and the prevalence of anthelmintic resistance (AR) in Australasia is lacking. Herein, we have systematically reviewed existing knowledge on the horse.


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Importance of resistance to anthelmintics in equine nematode populations Download PDF EPUB FB2

2. Anthelmintic resistance. Interval-based treatment programmes, which have been used extensively in the equine industry, will be expected to select resistance alleles within nematode populations (Kaplan and Nielsen, ).Resistance to the earlier registered anthelmintics, the benzimidazoles and the tetrahydropyrimidines, has been reported many times in cyathostomin populations Cited by:   2.

Anthelmintic resistance. Interval-based treatment programmes, which have been used extensively in the equine industry, will be expected to select resistance alleles within nematode populations (Kaplan and Nielsen, ).Cited by:   Helminth control in horses has been based on the administration of broad-spectrum anthelmintics for over 50 years, but although this has reduced clinical disease, anthelmintic-resistant populations of nematodes (for example, cyathostomins and Parascaris equorum) have developed due to frequent ‘blanket’ treatments.

Resistance to benzimidazole, pyrantel and, more recently, Cited by: 8. resistance in equine nematode populations and the complexity of R.M., Drug resistance in nematodes of veterinary importance: a status Anthelmintic resistance among equine. Many parasitic nematodes of veterinary importance have genetic features that favor the development of anthelmintic resistance.

Among the most important of these are rapid rates of nucleotide sequence evolution and extremely large effective population sizes that give these worms an exceptionally high level of genetic diversity 1, addition, most nematode species that have been Cited by:   Control of equine nematodes has relied on benzimidazoles (BZs), tetrahydropyrimidines and macrocyclic lactones.

The intensive use of anthelmintics has led to the development of anthelmintic resistance (AR) in equine cyathostomins and Parascaris studies indicate that BZ and pyrantel resistance is widespread in cyathostomins and there are also increasing reports of resistance.

By identifying and targeting treatment at horses with significant adult worm burdens, the overall use of anthelmintics has been reduced.

By allowing a significant portion of the worm population to remain unexposed to the drug, or in refugia, this has reduced the pressure for the development of resistance in these parasites. Development of anthelmintic resistance. Anthelmintic resistance (AR) is defined by Køhler as genetically transmitted loss of sensitivity of a drug in worm populations that were previously sensitive to the same drug [].In a worm population, alleles coding for resistance will be present as a result of mutations, also in unexposed populations.

parasite control approaches are important for the effective man-agement of AR (Cornelius et al., ), as it lowers the selection pressure on the whole population. The reversal or delaying the development of resistance to anthelmintics has been shown by maintaining the worm population in refugia in nematode.

A program of anthelmintic resistance involves multiple parasites and multiple drug classes, and must consider horses of all ages. No single parasite control program is ideal for all horses. Age of the horse, population density, region of the country, climate, method of confinement (eg, stall or pasture), and pasture size and quality can affect.

Anthelmintic resistance in nematodes of horses Ray M. KAPLAN* tion pressure on equine populations for nematode tolerance and resistance/immu- tomes important equine pathogens, and their importance is likely to grow as the prevalence and spectrum of anthelmintic.

Anthelmintic resistance is a global problem that threatens sustainable control of the equine gastrointestinal cyathostomins (Phylum Nematoda; Superfamily Strongyloidea). Of the three novel anthelmintic classes that have reached the veterinary market in the last decade, none are currently licenced in horses, hence current control regimens focus.

Intestinal nematodes are an important cause of equine disease. Of these parasites, the Cyathostominae are the most important group, both in terms of their prevalence and their pathogenicity.

Cyathostomin infections are complex and control is further complicated by ever‐increasing levels of resistance to some of the commonly used anthelmintics. Resistance of horse intestinal nematodes to anthelmintics is well documented worldwide. This problem is thought to be caused by intensive usage of antiparasitic drugs (Kaplan ).

In the last. The term 'anthelmintic drug resistance' describes the heritable ability of some nematode parasites to survive treatment with anthelmintic drugs at the recommended therapeutic dose levels.

Genes for resistance appear to be present in many of the important pathogenic nematodes of ruminants and horses. Under intensive management systems, where heavy reliance is placed on anthelmintic. The detection of anthelmintic resistance in nematodes of veterinary importance G.C.

Colesa,*, F. Jacksonb, W.E. Pomroyc, provided here for the detection of anthelmintic resistance in nematodes of ruminants, horses and pigs as a basis for discussion duals within a population. von Samson-Himmelstjerna, G. Anthelmintic resistance in equine parasites: detection, potential clinical relevance and implications for control.

methods for the detection of anthelmintic resistance in nematodes of veterinary importance. Vet Parasitol. 44, 35– Anthelmintic resistance in cyathostomin populations from horse. Current levels of resistance documented in major nematode parasites to the three anthelmintic classes in managed horse herds.

In the US, the large majority of studies have been performed in the south-eastern states, and there is very little information from other regions. Drug class Cyathostomins Large strongyles Parascaris spp.

Cyathostominae egg reappearance period after treatment with major horse anthelmintics in donkeys. Journal of Equine Veterinary Science,65, Lawson, E., Burden, F. And Elsheikha, H. Pyrantel resistance in two herds of donkey in. The control of gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) of cattle in pasture-based production systems such as Ireland is highly dependent on the availability of efficacious anthelmintics.

There is very little information available on the efficacy of the broad-spectrum anthelmintics against GIN of cattle in Ireland and the aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of anthelmintic resistance on.

Ivermectin resistance is a further concern in the small intestinal nematode, Parascaris equorum, an important pathogen of foals. These issues indicate that horse nematodes must now be controlled using methods less dependent on anthelmintic use and more reliant on management practices designed to reduce the force of infection in the environment.SUMMARY The resistance status of gastro–intestinal nematodes to anthelmintics was evaluated on sheep farms throughout Australia during – Resistance was shown to be widespread.

Overall, 85% of farms had sheep infected with nematodes resistant to benzimidazole, 65% to levamisole and 34% to combination (benzimidazole + levamisole) products.

There are many reasons for this. Recent studies demonstrate that anthelmintic resistance in equine parasites is highly prevalent and multiple‐drug resistance is common in some countries, but few veterinarians take this into account when making treatment decisions or when recommending rotation of anthelmintics.